Jun 21 – 26, 2015
Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania
Europe/Rome timezone
All the plenary sessions will be transmitted in streaming on the web. From Monday, June 22nd, a link will be available <a href='http://www.streamago.tv/channel/54955/default/iframe/' target='blank'> here </a>

An Overview of Resonance Measurements at the ALICE Experiment

Jun 23, 2015, 5:25 PM
25m
Aula F (Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania)

Aula F

Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania

Invited Talk - Parallel Session Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

Speaker

Dr Anders Knospe (The University of Texas at Austin, Bozeman, USA)

Click here to download the template: <a href="https://agenda.infn.it/materialDisplay.py?materialId=3&confId=5235"> Word </a>, <a href="https://agenda.infn.it/materialDisplay.py?materialId=2&confId=5235">Latex</a>

Resonances play a unique role in the study of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Resonance yields, which may be modified by rescattering and regeneration after hadronization, can be used to study the properties of the hadronic phase of the collision. The modification of resonance masses or widths would be a signature of chiral symmetry restoration near the phase transition temperature. The transverse-momentum spectra of the proton and the $\phi(1020)$ can be used to study the mechanisms of particle production. In addition, resonance measurements in pp and p--Pb collisions help to distinguish initial-state effects from the effects of the hot and dense final state. The ALICE Collaboration has studied the $\mathrm{K}^{*}(892)^{0}$ and $\phi(1020)$ mesons in pp, p--Pb, and Pb--Pb collisions. Measurements of many resonance properties, including $\it{p}_{\mathrm{T}}$ spectra, integrated yields, masses, widths, mean $\it{p}_{\mathrm{T}}$ values, and the nuclear modification factors $R_{\mathrm{AA}}$ and $R_{\mathrm{pPb}}$, will be presented and compared to measurements from other experiments, non-resonances, and the predictions of theoretical models.

Primary author

Dr Anders Knospe (The University of Texas at Austin, Bozeman, USA)

Presentation materials