DESHIMA on ASTE: First astronomical light captured with an integrated superconducting spectrometer

26 Jul 2019, 15:30
15m
Auditorium G. Testori (Milano)

Auditorium G. Testori

Milano

Piazza Città di Lombardia, 1, 20124 Milano MI
Oral Presentation Low Temperature Detector Applications Orals LM 004

Speaker

Dr Akira Endo (Delft University of Technology)

Description

A wideband, large field-of-view (sub)millimeter wave imaging spectrometer is the key technology for uncovering dust-enshrouded cosmic star formation and galaxy evolution over cosmic time. Here we report the first astronomical signal captured with an integrated superconducting spectrometer (ISS): a spectrometer that uses a small superconducting integrated circuit for dispersing the signal to achieve a wide instantaneous bandwidth, and to detect the signal in each spectral band. The compact size of the spectrometer and the absence of a local oscillator makes this technology very well suited for constructing spectral imaging arrays.

We present the first on-sky results of DESHIMA (Deep Spectroscopic High-redshift Mapper), obtained from October to December 2017 on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE), a 10 m diameter antenna in the Atacama Desert of Chile. On the ISS chip of DESHIMA, the signal is captured by a lens-antenna and subsequently travels through a coplanar waveguide made of superconducting NbTiN, from which co-planar NbTiN bandpass filters branch out to divide the signal into separate frequency channels. At the output of each filter is a NbTiN/Al hybrid microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID). The DESHIMA prototype is a 1-pixel spectrometer that covers the 332-377 GHz band with 49 spectral channels, offering a spectral resolution F/dF ~ 380. We present detection of molecular emission lines from various sources, including a weakly redshifted CO line from the luminous infrared galaxy VV 114. The on-sky performance shows excellent agreement between the design and laboratory measurement in terms of the sensitivity, optical efficiency and beam pattern. In addition, we present wideband spectral maps of extended sources to demonstrate the potential of the ISS technology towards spectroscopic direct imaging.

Less than 5 years of experience since completion of Ph.D N
Student (Ph.D., M.Sc. or B.Sc.) N

Primary authors

Dr Akira Endo (Delft University of Technology) Dr Kenichi Karatsu (SRON) Dr Yoichi Tamura (Nagoya University) Dr Tai Oshima (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) Dr Akio Taniguchi (Nagoya University) Tatsuya Takekoshi (The University of Tokyo) Dr Shin'ichiro Asayama (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) Dr Tom Bakx (Nagoya University) Mr Sjoerd Bosma (Delft University of Technology) Juan Bueno (SRON) Mr Kay Wuy Chin (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) Dr Yasunori Fujii (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) Mr Kazuyuki Fujita (Hokkaido University) Mr Robert Huiting (SRON) Dr Soh Ikarashi (Delft University of Technology) Mr Tsuyoshi Ishida (The University of Tokyo) Dr Shun Ishii (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) Prof. Ryohei Kawabe (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) Prof. Teun Klapwijk (Delft University of Technology) Prof. Kotaro Kohno (The University of Tokyo) Prof. Akira Kouchi (Hokkaido University) Prof. Nuria Llombart (Delft University of Technology) Dr Jun Maekawa (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) Mr Vignesh Murugesan (SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research) Prof. Nakatsubo Shunichi (JAXA) Dr Masato Naruse (Saitama University) Dr Kazushige Ohtawara (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) Mr Alejandro Pascual Laguna (SRON) Dr Junya Suzuki (KEK) Mr Suzuki Koyo (Nagoya University) Mr David Thoen (Delft University of Technology) Dr Takashi Tsukagoshi (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka) Mr Tetsutaro Ueda (Nagoya University) Dr Pieter de Visser (SRON) Prof. Paul van der Werf (Leiden University) Dr Stephen Yates (SRON) Mr Yuki Yoshimura (The University of Tokyo) Dr Ozan Yurduseven Prof. Jochem Baselmans (SRON)

Presentation Materials