High-spatial resolution neutron imaging by using current-biased kinetic inductance detector

25 Jul 2019, 11:45
15m
Auditorium G. Testori (Milano)

Auditorium G. Testori

Milano

Piazza Città di Lombardia, 1, 20124 Milano MI
Invited Presentation Low Temperature Detector Applications Orals LM 004

Speaker

Prof. Takekazu Ishida (Division of Quantum and Radiation Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University)

Description

We developed a neutron transmission imager based on a superconducting current-biased kinetic inductance detector (CB-KID). The CB-KID comprises X and Y meanderlines and a 10B conversion layer for neutrons. A 4He or 7Li ion from the 10B(n, α)7Li reaction creates two hot spots in both the X and Y meanders. A pair of electromagnetic-wave pulses of opposite polarities propagate toward the ends of meanderlines[1]. The position of the nuclear reaction point can be evaluated from a difference in arrival timestamps of the two pulses at the two ends. We used a set of analog signal discriminators with fixed thresholds and a time-to-digital converter (TDC) with 1-ns time resolution to recover the signals from 25-Hz pulsed neutrons of J-PARC. The energy-integrated spatial resolution reached 22 μm[2]. Further improvements in spatial resolution can be achieved by using a pair of CB-KIDs to compensate the randomness of the emitted direction of light ions from the 10B reaction. PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System) is a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code developed to deal with the transport of all particles over wide energy ranges, using several nuclear reaction models and nuclear data libraries[3]. PHITS simulations demonstrated that the neutron imaging can be enhanced appreciably with two CB-KIDs.
This work is supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) No.16H02450 from JSPS. The devices were fabricated in the clean room for analog-digital superconductivity (CRAVITY). This work is supported of MLF program of J-PARC (Proposal No. 2016B0012, 2017A0011, 2017B0014, 2018A0109, No. 2018P0201, No. 2019A0004).
1. T. Koyama, T. Ishida, J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 1054 012055 (2018).
2. H. Shishido, Y. Miki, H. Yamaguchi, Y. Iizawa, Vu T. Dang, K. M. Kojima, T. Koyama, K. Oikawa, M. Harada, S. Miyajima, M. Hidaka, T. Oku, K. Soyama, S. Y. Suzuki, T. Ishida, Phys. Rev. Appl. 10 044044 (2018).
3. T. Sato et al, J. Nucl. Sci. Tech. 10, 684-690 (2018).

Less than 5 years of experience since completion of Ph.D N
Student (Ph.D., M.Sc. or B.Sc.) N

Primary author

Prof. Takekazu Ishida (Division of Quantum and Radiation Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University)

Co-authors

Dr The Dang Vu (Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, ) Prof. Hiroaki Shishido (Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University) Mr Kazuma Nishimura (Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University) Prof. Kenji M Kojima (Centre for Molecular and Materials Science, TRIUMF) Dr Kenich Oikawa (Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency) Dr Masahide Harada (Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency) Dr Shigeyuki Miyajima (Advanced ICT Research Institute, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) Dr Mutsuo Hidaka (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technolog) Dr Takayuki Oku (Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency) Dr Kazuhiko Soyama (Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency) Dr Kazuya Aizawa (Materials and Life Science Division, J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agenc) Dr Tomio Koyama (Division of Quantum and Radiation Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University,) Dr Alex Malins (Center for Computational Science & e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency) Dr Masahiko Machida (Center for Computational Science & e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency)

Presentation Materials