Low Temperature MMC Detector Arrays for the IAXO experiment

23 Jul 2019, 17:45
1h 15m
Piazza Città di Lombardia (Milano)

Piazza Città di Lombardia

Milano

Piazza Città di Lombardia, 1, 20124 Milano MI
Poster Low Temperature Detector Applications Poster session

Speaker

Loredana gastaldo (Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University)

Description

The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) is searching for axions or axion-like particles generated in the Sun. A large magnetic field is used to convert solar axions to photons via the Primakoff effect. The major part of the expected spectrum considering only axion-photon coupling covers an energy range up to 10 keV with its maximum at about 3 keV. X-ray detectors with high efficiency in this energy range and low intrinsic background are required. Low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) fulfil these requirements and can reach very low thresholds below 100 eV. We present the design of a new detector system for the IAXO experiment with the possibility to operate two different kinds of two dimensional MMC arrays. The setup is designed to host a large area MMC array with moderate energy resolution aiming to discover events related to axions. If axions were discovered the focus would move to spectroscopic studies. In this case a smaller MMC array featuring higher energy resolution would replace the initial array using the same setup. We show the current status of the experimental platform and discuss methods to identify background events based on pulse shape analysis and events coincidence in several pixels.

Less than 5 years of experience since completion of Ph.D N
Student (Ph.D., M.Sc. or B.Sc.) N

Primary authors

Loredana gastaldo (Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University) Christian Enss (Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University) Andreas Fleischmann (Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University) Daniel Hengstler (Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University) Sebastian Kempf (Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University) Daniel Unger (Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University)

Presentation Materials