GWADW2016 - Impact of Recent Discoveries on Future Detector Design

chaired by Francesco Fidecaro (PI), Syd Meshkov (Caltech)
from to (Europe/Rome)
at Hotel Hermitage, La Biodola, Isola d'Elba
Description
The recent detection of the merger of  two high stellar mass black holes, thereby confirming the existence in nature of GW sources that have heretofore only been hypothesized, will surely influence the design of future GW detectors.   Massive binary systems have luminosities allowing the advanced detectors to see them to cosmological distance and provide most of their SNR in the mid-to-low frequency band of GW interferometers. However, we must ensure, in our design efforts, that frequencies both above and below this range are also adequately covered. With aLIGO having completed its first observational run and now in full commissioning mode to prepare for the second run later this year, with aVirgo expected to join this next run once they have performed preliminary commissioning, and with KAGRA in an advanced construction phase, we are entering the regime of observational astronomy using GWs. This is a propitious time to consider the impact of GW150914 on ideas for near term detector enhancements as well as on the design of future detectors. This workshop will explore a variety of technologies and concepts relevant to these goals.
At GWADW 2015, in Alaska, a new format was introduced which had two days of parallel sessions. The new format was deemed successful, and we will repeat it this year with slight variations.  There will be three parallel sessions instead of last year’s four, and these will be spread over three days, instead of two, thereby providing more time to interact.
 

Email gwadw2016@pi.infn.it
Go to day
  • Sunday, 22 May 2016
    • 17:00 - 19:30 Registration ( La Biodola, Isola d'Elba ( Sala Elba ) )
    • 19:30 - 21:00 Welcome Cocktail ( La Biodola, Isola d'Elba ( by the pool ) )
  • Monday, 23 May 2016
    • 08:20 - 09:00 Plenary 1
      Location: La Biodola, Isola d'Elba ( Sala Maria Luisa )
      • 08:20 Welcome 10'
        Speaker: Francesco Fidecaro (Pisa)
      • 08:30 Setting the stage 30'
        Speaker: Francesco Fidecaro (Pisa)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 09:00 - 10:30 Plenary 1: GW150914: Effect on Near Term Plans
      Convener: Lisa Barsotti (LIGO-MIT), Cole Miller (Maryland)
      Location: La Biodola, Isola d'Elba ( Sala Maria Luisa )
      • 09:00 What Binary Black Holes Teach 45'
        Speakers: Steven Fairhurst (Cardiff), Salvatore Vitale (LIGO MIT)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:45 High and Low Frequency Sensitivity Improvements 45'
        Speaker: Lisa Barsotti (LIGO-MIT)
    • 10:30 - 11:00 coffee break ( La Biodola, Isola d'Elba ( Parking area ) )
    • 11:00 - 12:30 Plenary 2 - Science case for future Detectors
      Convener: Bangalore Sathyaprakash (Cardiff University)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 11:00 Global Network of 2G+ and 3G Detectors 45'
        Speaker: Bangalore Sathyaprakash (Cardiff University)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 11:45 Multimessenger Astronomy 45'
        Speaker: Steven Fairhurst (Cardiff)
    • 12:30 - 16:00 lunch ( La Biodola, Isola d'Elba ( Fuoco di bosco ) )
    • 16:00 - 17:30 Plenary 3 - Workshop goals
      Convener: Jan Harms (FI), Jo van den Brand (Nikhef - VU), Dennis Coyne (LIGO Lab), Fabrice Matichard (MIT), Eric Gustafson (Caltech), Iain Martin (University of Glasgow), Riccardo Bassiri (Stanford University), Giampietro Cagnoli (LMA - UCBL)
      Location: La Biodola, Isola d'Elba ( Sala Maria Luisa )
      • 16:00 A. Low frequency 10'
        Speakers: Jan Harms (FI), Jo van den Brand (Nikhef - VU)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 16:10 B. Introduction to thermal noise workshop and goals 10'
        Speaker: GIANPIETRO CAGNOLI (LMA - UCBL)
        Material: Slides powerpoint file}
      • 16:20 C. Controls 10'
        Speakers: Dennis Coyne (LIGO Lab), Fabrice Matichard (MIT)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 17:30 - 18:00 coffee break ( La Biodola, Isola d'Elba ( Parking area ) )
    • 18:00 - 19:30 Plenary 4 - Cryogenics
      Convener: Kazuhiro Yamamoto (Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The university of Tokyo), Seiji Kawamura (ICRR - The University of Tokyo), Kentaro Somiya (Caltech)
      Location: La Biodola,Isola d'Elba ( Sala Maria Luisa )
      • 18:00 Cyogenics session overview 10'
        Speaker: Giles Hammond (University of Glasgow)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 18:10 Overview of the 20 K configuration 25'
        Speaker: KAZUHIRO YAMAMOTO (Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The university of Tokyo)
        Material: Slides powerpoint file}
      • 18:35 Overview of the 120 K configuration 25'
        Speaker: Christopher Wipf (Caltech LIGO)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 19:00 Cryogenics Round Table 30'
        Speakers: Giles Hammond (University of Glasgow), KAZUHIRO YAMAMOTO (Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The university of Tokyo), Ronny Nawrodt (Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena), Christopher Wipf (Caltech LIGO), Rana Adhikari (Caltech)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
  • Tuesday, 24 May 2016
    • 09:00 - 10:30 Low frequency workshop
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 09:00 Newtonian Seismic Array at LHO 15'
        Speaker: Jenne Driggers (Caltech)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:45 Ambient Seismic Noise 15'
        Speaker: Xander Campman (Shell)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 09:00 - 10:35 Thermal noise & coatings workshop
      Location: Sala Elena
      • 09:00 Amorphous dielectric coatings 40'
        Speaker: Martin Fejer (Stanford University)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:40 Atomic structure investigations of amorphous coatings 20'
        Speaker: Riccardo Bassiri (Stanford University)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 10:00 Modeling coating thermal noise for gravitational wave detectors 20'
        Speaker: Chris Billman (University of Florida)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 10:20 New results on losses correlation with structure 15'
        Speaker: Elodie Coillet (Lyon)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 10:35 - 11:00 coffee break
    • 11:00 - 12:30 Low frequency workshop
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 11:00 Towards Low Frequency Gravitational Force Sensing 15'
        Speaker: Bram Slagmolen (The Australian National University)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 11:30 TOBA: a Low-frequency Gravitational-Wave AntennaMasaki 15'
        Speaker: Masaki Ando (Univ. of Tokyo)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 12:00 Sensitivity limits of atom interferometry gravity gradiometers and strainmeters 15'
        Speaker: Fiodor Sorrentino (INFN - Genova)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 11:00 - 12:30 Thermal noise & coatings workshop
      Location: Sala Elena
      • 11:00 Discussion 1h30'
    • 12:30 - 16:00 lunch ( Fuoco di bosco )
    • 16:00 - 17:30 Plenary 5 - LISA Pathfinder
      Convener: Stefano Vitale (MIT - LIGO)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 16:00 LISA in the post detection and post LISA Pathfinder era 30'
        Speaker: Karsten Danzmann (AEI Hannover)
      • 16:30 Toward LISA in the USA 30'
        Speaker: John Conklin (University of Florida)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 17:00 LISA Pathfinder scientific operations 30'
        Speaker: Stefano Vitale (TN)
    • 17:30 - 18:00 cheese&wine ( Parking area )
    • 18:00 - 19:30 Poster Session
      • 18:00 A Tunable Resonant Detector for Low Frequency Gravitational Waves
        All practical proposals to detect low frequency gravitational waves in the frequency range 0.001 Hz to 0.1 Hz involve multi-satellite spaceborne devices with laser interferometry over very large distances. Here I outline the concept study  of a single resonant interferometer detector operating within a single drag-free satellite, capable of strain sensitivity better than 10^-20/√(Hz) for gravitational waves in the frequency range 0.001 Hz to 0.1 Hz. The resonance frequency and bandwidth are optically tunable, enabling continuous tracking of slowly evolving massive BH binary sources emitting in this frequency range. The interferometer operates in the Fabry-Perot mode with weakly coupled mass-mirrors with  low resonance frequency and high Q, and a near-resonant auxiliary laser tunes the frequency using optical spring effect. The F-P cavity and moderate Q enables resonant strain sensitivity about 10^-20/√(Hz) and tunability enables resonant tracking for long integration.
        Speaker: Prof. CS Unnikrishnan (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India)
      • 18:00 New OSEM results using a displacement-doubling prism-based flag
        The suspension systems for future Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors require an improved level of immunity to sources of mechanical perturbation of their suspended test-masses. The displacement sensors used to mitigate such perturbations (OSEMs) need to be upgraded for improving their performance in frequency range < 1 Hz. The conceptual design of displacement shadow sensors utilising a ‘displacement doubling prism’ [1] is presented. 
        
        Reference: 1. N.A. Lockerbie, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A, 741 (2014) 192–195.
        Speaker: Dr. Nicholas Lockerbie (University of Strathclyde)
        Material: Poster pdf file}
      • 18:00 TOBA: a Low-frequency Gravitational-Wave Antenna
        We are developing a new-type of gravitational-wave antenna, named TOBA (TOrsion-Bar Antenna). I will present the current status of our reaesch activities.
        Speaker: Prof. Masaki Ando (University of Tokyo)
      • 18:00 Ultra-quiet Mirror Suspensions for the Glasgow Sagnac Speed Meter
        The main goal of the Glasgow Sagnac Speed Meter is to show reduced back action noise compared to a Michelson interferometer with equivalent parameters. In order to ensure limitation by back action noise the input test masses of the two triangular arm cavities are chosen to be 1g mirrors. To achieve the necessary isolation from seismic motion all optics need to be suspended by multi-cascaded pendulums. This poster presents the different suspension designs used in this proof of concept experiment and highlights the challenges for the 1g mirror suspensions.
        Speaker: Mr. Jan-Simon Hennig (University of Glasgow)
      • 18:00 Vibration Isolation System for KAGRA: Overview and Results in the First Operation
        KAGRA is a Japanese interferometric gravitational-wave telescope with an arm length of 3 km. Main features of KAGRA are 1) placing underground and 2) cooling down mirrors to cryogenic temperature. The test operation with room temperature is over in April 2016. 
        We achieve vibration isolation of mirrors with long multistage suspension systems called seismic attenuation systems (SAS.) Each stage has functions to lower its resonant frequency. Because the whole of suspension system has to be operated with the interferometer, its control system becomes very complicated. I report an overview of KAGRA's vibration isolation systems and results of suspension performance in the first operation.
        Speaker: Mr. Koki Okutomi (Sokendai (GUAS))
      • 18:00 Reduction of Seismic Coupling Noise for TOBA
        TOBA(TOrsion-Bar Antenna) is a gravitational wave detector using a torsion pendulum. The resonant frequency of torsional motion is ~1mHz, therefore it is sensitive to gravitational waves at lower frequency band (0.1-10Hz) even on the ground. Two prototype TOBAs were developed and they achieved strain sensitivity h ~ 1e-8/rtHz @0.1Hz - 1e-10/rtHz @5Hz. One of the dominant noise sources for them was seismic noise, especially coupling noise from translational seismic motion to test mass rotation. In order to improve the sensitivity and detect gravitational waves, it is indispensable to reduce this coupling noise. Here we show the specified five coupling routes and reduction methods for them.
        Speaker: Tomofumi Shimoda (University of Tokyo)
      • 18:00 Ambient seismic noise and its potential use in seismic exploration and monitoring
        We investigate to what extent subsurface information can be extracted from ambient seismic noise. Seismic noise is always present in seismic records and can be measured around the world, even in the quietest deserts. This makes noise an excellent candidate for seismic exploration or monitoring (and a nuisance for gravitational wave detection). The modal structure and strength of the noise field depend on several factors, such as noise-source distribution and mechanism, depth of observation, atmospheric conditions, geographical location of observation, local geology, regional tectonic activity, etc. We study the characteristics of seismic noise in the frequency range 0.05-10 Hz. We discuss the measurement and analysis of seismic noise and present results from experiments in The Netherlands, Libya, Egypt and Saudi Arabia. Next, we review methods to extract subsurface information from noise. Finally we show examples of successful surface-wave or body-wave retrieval from seismic noise.
        Speaker: Xander Campman (Shell Global Solutions International B.V.)
      • 18:00 Installation of Input Mode Cleaner of iKAGRA
        [Background]
        I installed Input Mode Cleaner(IMC) in iKAGRA and did mode-matching for IMC using two lens. IMC is a big triangle cavity.
        Speaker: Mr. Shogo Kambara (University of Toyama)
      • 18:00 Investigation of Suspension Upgrades for the Advanced LIGO Gravitational Wave Detector
        To increase the sensitivity of the current interferometric gravitational wave detectors,
        an upgrade plan for the US based detectors, or “Advanced LIGO (aLIGO),” is being
        studied. As part of this upgrade, changing the mass, stress, and length of the suspension for
        the mirrors in the interferometers is considered to improve noise sources. From the previous
        year’s Matlab modeling result, the higher stress in the fibre and the longer last stage showed
        improvements in the detector’s sensitivity. Since the last stage of the suspension is held by
        fused silica fibres, which have very low loss to minimise suspension thermal noise, one of the
        challenges for this upgrade will be producing thinner and longer fibres that can hold the test
        mass safely. In this report, the impact laser stabilisation on fused silica fibres’ geometry and
        strength is being investigated to allow further improvements on fibre production to achieve
        aLIGO upgrades.
        Speaker: Kyung Ha Lee (University of Glasgow)
      • 18:00 Coil-Coil Actuator for reduction of magnetic noise
        For reduction of magnetic noise of coil-magnet actuators, we developed a new type of actuator; coil-coil actuator. It consists of only coils instead of magnet and current applied to the coils is modulated. We can choose any modulation frequency to reduce ambient magnetic noise coupling, while keeping the actuation force sufficiently strong. In this poster, we show our experimental results for evaluation and reduction of the magnetic noise of a coil-coil actuator.
        Speaker: Mr. Naoki Aritomi (University of Tokyo)
      • 18:00 Characterisation of the aLIGO monolithic suspensions
        At Glasgow we are working to improve the characterization of the aLIGO detector monolithic suspensions. 
        We have utilized realtime monitoring software to extract frequency, phase and amplitude of the fused silica suspension fibre violin modes. This has allowed the measurement of the Q-factors of some of these modes.
        
        In addition, we have used preliminary FEA modeling of the fibre profiles, measured during aLIGO detector suspension installation, to predict the observed departure of the frequencies of violin mode harmonics from whole multiples of the fundamental frequency.
        
        Using these analysis techniques for the lower glass stage of the suspension, in the future we shall compare the measured violin mode Q values with detailed FEA modeling of the aLIGO detectors monolithic suspensions. This information will help to better understand the aLIGO detectors low frequency noise performance.
        Speaker: Dr. Borja Sorazu (University of Glasgow)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 18:00 A study of contamination in gravitational wave detectors
        The cryogenic sapphire mirrors in KAGRA are expected to suffer from many contaminations due to dust adhesion and gas molecules. The contamination due to dust particles is occurred during their installation process. The cryogenic contamination effect has not been studied correctly in the actual KAGRA cryostat system. To estimate these possible total contaminations in the cryostat, we firstly try to find how much dust is put on mirrors and how much optical loss will be generated from various size of dust. For this purpose, we prepared high reflective mirrors contaminated by the NIST traceable standard particles that have uniform size and the optical loss was checked by the storage time and transfer function of Fabry-Perot cavity composed of these contaminated mirrors. The distribution density of the NIST particle on mirrors was checked by microscope and image analysis method. As the next step, we are going to measure the dependence of optical loss on the number and size of particles.
        Speaker: Mr. Kunihiko Hasegawa (Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo,)
      • 18:00 Trade-offs for squeezed light injection in a non-perfect world
        (will follow)
        Speaker: Emil Schreiber (Albert Einstein Institute Hannover)
      • 18:00 Reduction of quantum noise for gravitational wave detector KAGRA (I)
        The design sensitivity of bKAGRA is limited by quantum noise for almost all the observation frequency band. As the first detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO shows, it would be especially important to improve the sensitivity around 100 Hz, where radiation pressure noise would be dominant. To reduce radiation pressure noise and beat the standard quantum limit, a method where the ponderomotively-squeezed output field from the interferometer is detected with homodyne detection was proposed.
        
        For the demonstration of the technique to reduce radiation pressure noise, an experiment with a cavity which has a milligram-scale suspended mirror as a end test mass is ongoing in our laboratory. In this presentation, overview and current status of the experiment are presented. Especially, a new method of intensity stabilization of light for the reduction of classical radiation pressure noise below quantum radiation pressure noise is presented.
        Speaker: Mr. Yutaro Enomoto (ICRR, University of Tokyo)
      • 18:00 Dynamics of Fiber Amplifiers in the Context of Gravitational Wave Detectors’ Laser Sources
        After the first direct detection of gravitational waves, the GW community faces the challenge of improving the frequency range and sensitivity of the next generation of GWDs. Two approaches to achieve it are the power scaling of laser sources and the use of cryogenically cooled crystalline silicon-based optical components, which requires the operation at longer wavelength. These improvements need new concepts of laser sources that are not totally defined yet. Fiber amplifiers in Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) configuration are demonstrating to be good candidates to meet the requirements of the next generation of GWDs. In this work we study the non-linear processes of gain and temporal dynamics in Er-doped, Yb-doped and Er:Yb-codoped fiber amplifiers with the aim of developing single-frequency, high-power fiber sources at 1μm and 1.5μm with long-term stability. The study of the amplifier dynamics also provides valuable information to realize stabilization loops.
        Speaker: Mr. Omar de Varona (LaserZentrum Hannover)
      • 18:00 Reduction of quantum noise for gravitational wave detector KAGRA (II)
        In KAGRA, a ponderomotive squeezing technique with a homodyne detection is going to be used for reducing radiation pressure noise. For demonstrating the reduction technique, at first, radiation pressure noise should be observed in wide frequency range. For that purpose, the high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a suspended tiny mirror is used for enhancing radiation pressure noise. However, when the intracivity power increases, an angular instability generated by radiation pressure can occur in the cavity depending on the geometry of the cavity. For circumventing the angular instability of the cavity, an angular control system using radiation pressure itself was invented. It was confirmed experimentally that the cavity consisting a suspended 23-mg mirror was unstable without the angular control system under high intracavity power condition. Moreover, with the same intracavity power condition, it was also proved that, using the angular control system, the cavity could be operated stably.
        Speaker: Mr. Koji Nagano (ICRR)
      • 18:00 Optical levitation of a mirror
        An optomechanical device reaching the standard quantum limit (SQL) of a force measurement plays a prominent roll for studying quantum mechanics. To prepare such a device, a mechanical oscillator well isolated from the environment is essential for the reduction of thermal disturbances. Here we propose an optical levitation of a mirror with two vertical Fabry-Perot cavities linearly aligned. We show the stability of the system and demonstrate the feasibility of reaching the SQL with this system.
        Speaker: Dr. Yuta Michimura (Department of Physics, University of Tokyo)
      • 18:00 Electromagnetic Derivation of Thermal Noise in Grating Reflectors
        Coating thermal noise is known to be a crucial limitation of future gravitational wave detectors’ sensitivity. As a potential solution for this issue is given by replacing conventional multilayer based optical components by monolithic crystalline grating reflectors. In this contribution thermal noise in grating reflectors is directly related to the electromagnetic field distribution in these structures. The presented results enable the physical understanding of noise processes in grating reflectors and provide the possibility for a targeted optimization of the structure parameters for minimized thermal noise in the future.
        Speaker: Stefanie Kroker (Braunschweig University of Technology, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt)
      • 18:00 FINESSE 2.1 - with Multimode Squeezing
        FINESSE is a free and open source frequency domain modelling software for optical experiments. FINESSE and its Python wrapper PyKat are used in commissioning and design of gravitational wave detectors. We have recently enabled for modelling of multimode squeezing and parametric instability. The parametric instability model has successfully been tested against first experimental results. Further we announce a web page for learning gravitational wave laser interferometry, FINESSE and PyKat. The material is available in HTML and IPython/Jupyter Notebook formats, and is thought to serve as both self-study material for beginners as well as reference material for experienced users.
        Speaker: Mr. Daniel Toyra (University of Birmingham)
      • 18:00 The input optics for iKAGRA
        In this poster, the summary of the input optics for the iKAGRA(initial KAGRA) will be reported. 
        The iKAGRA operation was done in March and April in 2016.  The input optics for iKAGRA includes the PSL(pre-stabilized laser), the IMC (input mode cleaner), IFI (input Faraday isolator) and IMMT(input mode matching telescope). In this poster mainly the PSL and the IMC will be reported.
        Speaker: Mr. Masayuki Nakano (ICRR)
      • 18:00 Large band low frequency sensors based on Watt’s linkage for future generations of interferometric detectors
        We present a compact and light low frequency sensor based on a horizontal folded pendulum mechanical design. The device can be used as an inertial sensor for the control system of seismic attenuators of present and future gravitational wave detectors.
        The instrument has been developed by the Applied Physics Group of the University of Salerno while the readout, control electronics and software by the INFN Pisa Group.
        Speaker: Valerio Boschi (PI)
        Material: Poster pdf file}
      • 18:00 Silicate bonding extends to the photonics industry
        Silicate Bonding has been used to assemble fused silica suspensions with low mechanical loss in quasi-monolithic optical systems for space missions aimed at tests of GR and in ground-based GW detectors. The technique also has broader applications including the construction of compound optical systems capable of withstanding high laser powers. Study of the optical properties of components assembled using this technique is thus of interest. We report on the bonding of phosphate glass and the measurement of some of the properties of the bond: optical index,thickness, reflectance and Light Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT). The measured reflectance at 532nm is below 0.3% while the LIDT at 1535nm is 650MW/cm^2 (6.5J/cm^2 ). Both these values are in line with the usual requirements for high power lasers which opens the way to promising applications. Future work should focus on extending the measurements and bonding other materials for applications in photonics such as YAG or sapphire.
        Speaker: Mr. Gregoire Lacaille (Gooch and Housego)
      • 18:00 Thermal conductivity of bonded materials for future generation gravitational wave observatories
        Future generations of gravitational wave detectors plan to use cryogenics in order to further reduce thermal noise associated with the mirror test masses and their suspensions.  Characterising the thermal conductivity of the candidate materials for these mirror suspension systems (e.g. single-crystal silicon and sapphire), and quantifying the optimum heat flow through compatible bonding techniques for these materials, is therefore crucial.  Preliminary results are presented here for hydroxide catalysis bonded silicon (100) samples of combined dimension 5x5x40mm. These results show a lower limit for the thermal conductivity of the bond at the level of 0.059 W/m/K.  Studies will continue in order to better evaluate the thermal conductivity of hydroxide catalysis bonds, and investigate methods by which it may be optimised.
        Speaker: Mrs. Mariela Masso Reid (Institute for Gravitational Research/University of Glasgow)
      • 18:00 High power fibered electro-optics components
        We want to design a fibered electro-optic modulator and a fibered Faraday isolator able to withstand power greater than 100W. The aim of such components would be to simplify the path between the laser, possibly a fiber laser, and the under vacuum injection bench. By doing that we will reduce in particular the beam jitter noise.
        
        The main difficulty is about the fiber itself: how to keep a good beam quality (TEM00, polarization, noises...) while avoiding all the non linear effects that appear in fibers for such densities of power? 
        
        Here we present an active method to keep a stable injection and avoid the noises coming from a misalignment  between the input beam and the fiber. The error signal that we use is generated by a scan of the input of the fiber.
        We also present the investigations on a Large Mode Area fiber. Especially the compromise that has to be found between the quality of the output beam and the power that can be reach before facing Stimulated Brillouin Scattering.
        Speaker: M. Matthieu Gosselin (EGO, European Gravitational Observatory)
      • 18:00 Development of ultra-low optical and mechanical loss aSi coatings using novel ECR ion beam deposition
        Brownian thermal noise associated with the multilayer mirror coatings continues to limit the sensitivity of GW detectors within their most sensitive frequency band. Currently these coatings are fabricated using ion beam deposition (IBD), delivering sub-ppm-level optical absorption and ppm-level scatter. However, further reductions in mechanical dissipation will be essential to fully exploit planned upgrades to Advanced LIGO, e.g. squeezing. Researchers at UWS and UoG have developed a new generation of IBD. The ion source uses electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) within a λ/4 microwave (2.4GHz) cavity to produce an ultra-clean (filament-free) plasma and incorporates a gridless extraction supplying ion energies up to 15keV. Initial results of aSi films show optical absorption of 20ppm at 1550nm for a λ/4 stack (tenfold reduction) with an upper limit on the mechanical loss of 1.2e-4 (factor of 2 reduction over Ta2O5). Details of heated substrate deposition (up to 500C) are also presented.
        Speaker: Mr. David Vine (SUPA, University of the West of Scotland)
        Material: Slides powerpoint file}
      • 18:00 Thermoelastic damping in silicon and metallic discs: the mode-dependent branching effect
        For mechanical resonators in the acoustic band, thermo-elastic noise can be the dominant contribution to the thermal noise spectrum. Silicon membranes show a prominent thermoelastic peak below few kHz; silicon is widely used in precision applications  and it represents a suitable solution for the test masses of future cryogenic GW detectors. We measured with GeNS the thermoelastic loss in a set of silicon disk samples, and found a dependancy of the loss angle upon the normal mode geometry. This behavior is deduced from the  general theory in free disks but, to our knowledge, it was not yet shown in experiments. We also demonstrated that this feature is seen in homogeneous CuBe disks, proving that it is not related to the silicon anisotropy. We present the results of our measurements and  a new theoretical approach exploiting the entropy increase; eventually, the mode-dependent loss is explained in terms of the ratio among dilatation  energy and total elastic energy.
        Speaker: Matteo Lorenzini (GSSI)
      • 18:00 Laser power stabilization for future gravitational wave detectors
        The fundamental limit of all future generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors, namely quantum radiation pressure noise and photon shot noise, can only be reached with an improved laser power stability. The traditional active power stabilization schemes have also a fundamental limit set by the quantum noise (shot noise) in the sensing process which is bound by technical limitations of the maximal detectable power. In this poster we study a new scheme for power stabilization in which power fluctuations are transferred to another observable, the phase of the light field. The great advantage of such a scheme is to use the full beam power in the transfer process, and hence not be limited by the relative shot noise in the sensing process used by the traditional schemes. We present different experimental setups and also their sensitivity to detect relative power fluctuations of 10-9/sqrt(Hz).
        Speaker: Ms. Marina Trad Nery (Albert Einstein Institute)
      • 18:00 Developing a squeezed light source at Virgo site
        Recent works (AEI-GEO600 and LIGO collaboration) demonstrated that the squeezing technology is one of the major and more urgent upgrades of the 2nd generation of GW detectors. They demonstrated also that to completely benefit from the injection of a squeezed state into the ITF (IFO), frequency dependent squeezing is a must. The LIGO collaboration already started to realize his own freq. dependent squeezer, to be implemented into the ITFs.
        In this framework, I’ll present the steps undertaken from various INFN groups to realize a first prototype of freq. independent squeezer with the specific aim to be implemented in Advanced Virgo.
        Speaker: Matteo Leonardi (TIFP)
      • 18:00 Factors pertaining to the strength of four-fiber monolithic silica test mass suspensions.
        The diameter of the silica fibers used in the 40 kg quasi-monolithic aLIGO test mass suspensions was chosen as d = 400 µm to keep the bounce frequency below 10 Hz, and the violin mode frequencies above 500 Hz. For further improvement of detector performance at low-frequency reducing the vertical bounce mode frequency (linearly proportional to the fiber diameter) would be beneficial. A. Heptonstall et al suggested that the fiber diameter can be reduced to 288 µm; this thickness is sufficient to give a fiber strength three times larger than the static load in aLIGO suspension (still providing a reasonable safety margin). We analyze the strength of welded 4-fiber suspension. The additional factors such as strength of welded joints or stock misalignments may limit the suspension strength. The fiber's thickness is one of the few competitive limiting factors. In such case the fiber's diameter can be made near 300 µm and the full suspension strength should not be significantly affected.
        Speaker: Dr. Kirill Tokmakov (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.)
        Material: Poster pdf file}
      • 18:00 Environment at the underground GW detector KAGRA
        KAGRA is an interferometric gravitational-wave (GW) detector with 3-km arms in Japan.
        One of the main features of KAGRA is that it is constructed underground of the mountain.
        The underground has been considered to be suitable for the GW detectors since the environmental noise, such as seismic noise, is smaller.
        On the other hand, there are several problems characteristic in underground, such as spring water.
        In this poster, we will explain the current situation inside the KAGRA tunnel, using the environmental data took at the KAGRA site, such as seismic level, humidity, temperature, and so on.
        Speaker: Dr. Ayaka Shoda (NAOJ)
      • 18:00 Cryogenic mechanical loss of IBS silica
        Coating thermal noise is the limiting factor for detector strain sensitivity in the most sensitive frequency band. Future gravitational wave detectors are proposed to operate at cryogenic temperatures, where the mechanical loss of the low-index, amorphous silica coating layers is not well characterized and stands to be the dominant source of noise in the multi-layer mirror coating stack if amorphous silicon is found to be a viable replacement for the high-index layers (currently 25% Ti:Ta2O5). The low temperature mechanical loss of ion-beam sputtered silica is presented for a number of post-deposition heat treatments.
        Speaker: Mr. Raymond Robie (University of Glasgow)
      • 18:00 Indium bond research for crystalline cryogenic suspensions
        Pure indium bonds to itself and non-metallic substrates like fused silica with comparable ease. Its vacuum compatibility, thermal conductivity [1], malleability and low mechanical loss [2,3] and low melt point also make it a good candidate for use in cryogenic systems. Currently it is proposed for use in the sapphire KAGRA suspensions [6] as well as a possibility for the silicon interfaces of the future ET detector [5]. This poster explains two approaches to achieve strong, low noise indium bonds. One using layers of indium nanometres thick evaporated onto silicon substrates and bonded at the Institute for Gravitational Research in Glasgow. A second approach uses inductive heating of indium foil between sapphire substrates with the aim of bonding suspensions in a detector in-situ, conducted in part at the ICRR in Tokyo, Japan.
        Speaker: Ms. Margot Phelps (Institute for Gravitational Research, University of Glasgow)
      • 18:00 A high-isolation, low-loss, in-vacuum, thermally-controlled Faraday isolator
        A novel simple Faraday isolator system allowing for a good isolation factor and low throughput losses, under high vacuum and exposed to a source of medium-near infra-red continuous laser radiation is presented. An isolation factor as high as 40dB and losses lower than 3% can be reached in the presented set-up. The mechanical and optical configuration is detailed and the performances achieved are presented.
        Speaker: maddalena mantovani (EGO)
      • 18:00 Thermo-refractive noise measurement in the Advanced Virgo Output Mode Cleaner
        The Advanced Virgo OMC is composed of two monolithic cavities placed in
        series. The light is resonating in the fused silica substrate, which
        yields a length noise bounded by thermo-refractive noise.
        After introducing the specifications on the OMC length noise, tests and
        results of length-noise measurements at the level of the thermo-refractive-noise will be presented.
        We will also discuss the impact of the thermo-refractive noise on future detectors.
        Speaker: Mlle. Marine Ducrot (LAPP)
        Material: Poster pdf file}
      • 18:00 Angular control of Advanced Virgo suspended benches
        Most of the Advanced Virgo light sensing devices are located on 5 in
        vacuum suspended benches. The benches are suspended from a triple
        stage mSAS suspension, and the angular degrees of freedom are sensed
        and controlled from the ground using LVDTs and coil-magnet
        actuators. The angular control has stringent requirements 30 nrad rms
        and 3e-15 rad/rtHz above 10 Hz.  After introducing the system design,
        we present the first in air results of controlling the fully
        integrated system and striving to achieve these requirements.
        Speaker: Dr. Michal Was (LAPP/CNRS)
      • 18:00 Twin Signal Recycling for the Einstein Telescope
        The Einstein Telescope (ET) is a third-generation gravitational wave observatory with a target sensitivity of more than an order of magnitude higher than the current advanced detectors. ET will be located underground,consisting of three nested detectors, each of which is composed of two interferometers in xylophone configuration. In this poster we revisit the technique of Twin Signal Recycling (TSR), which leads to simultaneous resonant enhancement of both the upper and the lower signal sidebands. A comparison of this technique for a futuristic GEO-HF with arm cavities and ET-LF is also discussed here. For the latter, a preliminary attempt at a broadband reduction in quantum noise limited sensitivity by use of frequency dependent squeezing has been simulated using the numerical interferometer simulation package Finesse. The benefits of both these techniques are weighed by measuring the quantum noise limited sensitivity of ET-LF detuned signal recycling with twin signal recycled ET-LF.
        Speaker: Ms. Vaishali Adya (Leibniz Universität Hannover / AEI)
      • 18:00 Photoelasticity of Silicon and its temperature dependence
        The photoelastic coefficients p11-p12 and p44 of silicon for light of a wavelength of 1550 nm was measured using a rotating quarter wave plate polarimeter. The results p11-p12 = (-0.1139±0.0014) and p44 = (-0.0501±0.0014) for room temperature agree  well with previously published data for various wavelengths. Additional measurements for the temperature dependence of the p11-p12 coefficients were done using a similar setup combined with a cryostat allowing sample temperatures down to about 10 K. The measurements show a temperature dependence with a maximum deviation of about 10% relative to the room temperature value.
        Speaker: Rene Glaser (FSU Jena / IFK / TTP)
      • 18:00 Amorphous silicon as low loss, high refractive index material for dielectric mirror coatings
        The dielectric mirror coatings in aLIGO are made of alternating layers of silica and tantala. Such materials exhibit high mechanical loss at low temperature, therefore reducing the advantages of cooling as the primary solution to coating thermal noise. Amorphous silicon is a promising candidate as a replacement of tantala as high refractive index material in a Bragg stack. Having a refractive index higher than tantala, it allows for thinner layers, its low loss enables low thermal noise coatings. High optical absorption is the main limitation in exploiting aSi. We report on the characterisation of optical absorption and microscopic structure of amorphous silicon films.
        Speaker: Mr. Zeno Tornasi (University of Glasgow)
        Material: Poster pdf file}
      • 18:00 Comparison of ring-Sagnac and sloshing-Sagnac interferometer
        Speedmeters are becoming interesting for third generation gravitational wave detectors. Here we compare a new kind of sloshing-Sagnac interferometer with the ring-Sagnac interferometer. The sloshing-Sagnac requires  only linear cavities and has alternating resonant and anti-resonant cavities, which act as a type of Khalili-cavities. These have the potential advantage of allowing a reduction of the coating thermal noise. Here we evaluate the quantum noise limited sensitivity and the coating noise reduction compared to a conventional position-meter (such as Advanced LIGO).
        Speaker: Dr. Sabina Huttner (University of Glasgow)
      • 18:00 Reduction of Virgo Low Frequency environmental magnetic noise
        Mitigation works recently done in AdVirgo aiming to a reduction of low frequency magnetic noise pollution in experimental sensible areas.
        Speaker: Federico Paoletti (PI)
  • Wednesday, 25 May 2016
    • 09:00 - 10:30 Thermal noise & coatings workshop
      • 09:00 Amorphous optical coatings for gravitational-wave interferometers 20'
        Speaker: Massimo Granata (Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés - CNRS)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:20 Development of ultra-low optical and mechanical loss aSi coatings using novel ECR ion beam deposition 20'
        Speaker: Stuart Reid (University of the West of Scotland)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:40 Optical absorption of amorphous silicon coatings(included in previous slides) 20'
        Speaker: Iain Martin (University of Glasgow)
      • 10:00 Thermoelastic damping in silicon and metallic discs: the mode shape dependent branching effect 20'
        Speaker: Matteo Lorenzini (GSSI)
        Material: Slides powerpoint file}
    • 09:00 - 10:30 Controls Workshop: Angular control
      Convener: Jenne Driggers (Caltech)
      • 09:00 Angular loop consideration 10'
        Speaker: Jenne Driggers (Caltech)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:10 Angular control of Advanced Virgo suspended benches 10'
        Speaker: Michal Was (LAPP/CNRS)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:20 Hopes and Dreams: One Transfer Func4on Fi6ng Program to Rule Them All 10'
        Speaker: Jeffrey Kissel (CalTech)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:30 Radiation pressure induced instability 10'
      • 09:40 Discussion 50'
    • 10:30 - 11:00 coffee break ( Parking area )
    • 11:00 - 12:30 Thermal noise & coatings workshop
      • 11:00 Coatings Thermal noise workshop discussion points 10'
        Speaker: Riccardo Bassiri (Stanford University)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 11:10 Discussion 1h20'
    • 11:00 - 12:30 Controls Workshop: Local and Global Control
      Convener: Jeffrey Kissel (CalTech)
      • 11:00 MIMO damping 10'
      • 11:10 Fitting tools 10'
      • 11:20 How to use the earthquakes arrival predictor to put the IFO in robust mode 10'
        Speaker: Sebastien Biscans (MIT LIGO)
      • 11:30 Present and future of superattenuator control system 20'
        Speaker: Valerio Boschi (PI)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 11:50 Feedforward control for arm cavities 10'
      • 12:00 Discussion 20'
    • 12:30 - 16:00 lunch ( Fuoco di bosco )
    • 16:00 - 17:30 Plenary 6 - Enhanced interferometers near term (<12 years)
      Convener: Rana Adhikari (Caltech), Matteo Barsuglia (APC-CNRS), Daniel Sigg (LIGO Hanford Observatory)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 16:00 Summary of science goals 15'
        Speaker: Yanbei Chen (California Institute of Technology)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 16:15 LIGO: the A+ upgrade 10'
        Speaker: Lisa Barsotti (LIGO-MIT)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 16:25 Virgo upgrade plans 10'
        Speaker: Gianpietro Cagnoli (LMA - UCBL)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 16:35 Squeezing with long filter cavities 20'
        Speaker: Eleonora Capocasa (APC)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 16:55 Balanced homodyne readout 10'
        Speaker: Sebastian Steinlechner (University of Glasgow)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 17:05 Discussion 25'
    • 17:30 - 18:00 coffee break ( Parking area )
    • 18:00 - 19:30 Plenary 6 - Enhanced interferometers near term (<12 years)
      Convener: Rana Adhikari (Caltech), Matteo Barsuglia (APC-CNRS), Daniel Sigg (LIGO Hanford Observatory)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 18:00 Coating - What's available now and in the 5-10 years 8'
        Speaker: Riccardo Bassiri (Stanford University)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 18:08 What if we are stuck with the coatings I 8'
        Speaker: Stefan Ballmer (Syracuse University)
        Material: Slides powerpoint file}
      • 18:16 What if we are stuck with the coatings II 9'
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 18:25 Discussion 25'
      • 18:50 Voyager: Pros and cons of the cryo-silicon-2micron idea 10'
        Speaker: Rana Adhikari (Caltech)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 19:00 Discussion 30'
    • 20:00 - 23:30 Workshop reception ( Maitù Restaurant )
  • Thursday, 26 May 2016
    • 09:00 - 10:30 Low frequency workshop
      • 09:00 Low-frequency seismic sensors 15'
        Speaker: Conor Mow-Lowry (University of Birmingham)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:30 Sensor development and characterization at Nikhef 15'
        Speaker: Maria Bader (Nikhef)
      • 10:00 MEMS sensor development 15'
        Speaker: Boris Boom (Nikhef)
    • 09:00 - 10:30 Controls Workshop: Learning Algorithms for Tuning Global IFO Control Parameters
      Convener: Rana Adhikari (Caltech)
      • 09:00 What environmental changes or instrument drifts require re-tuning 10'
      • 09:10 Define inputs and outputs 10'
      • 09:20 Learning Methods for Interferometers 10'
        Speaker: Rana Adhikari (Caltech)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:30 Discussion 1h0'
    • 10:30 - 11:00 coffee break ( Parking area )
    • 11:00 - 12:30 Low frequency workshop
      • 11:00 Seismic rotational measurements 15'
        Speaker: Angela Di Virgilio (PI)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 11:30 NN modeling for MIGA 15'
        Speaker: Sophie Pelisson (LP2N-IOA)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 12:00 Atmospheric NN modeling 15'
        Speaker: Donatella Fiorucci (CNRS)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 11:00 - 12:30 Controls Workshop: Controls Considerations for Next Generation Detectors Designs
      Convener: Dennis Coyne (LIGO Lab)
      • 11:00 Brief description of next gen concepts 10'
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 11:10 Some thoughts on controls challenges, considerations for discussion 10'
        Material: Slides pdf filedown arrow
      • 11:20 Discussion 1h0'
    • 12:30 - 14:45 lunch ( Fuoco di bosco )
    • 14:45 - 16:00 Coordination of Future Development of Large Detectors
      Convener: Michele Punturo (PG), Ms. Sheila Rowan (University of Glasgow), David Reitze (Caktech)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 14:45 Possible models for GWIC’s role 15'
        Speaker: Sheila Rowan (University of Glasgow)
      • 15:00 Need for coordinated R&D: the ET perspective 15'
        Speaker: Michele Punturo (PG)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 15:15 Need for coordinated R&D: the LIGO perspective 15'
        Speaker: David Reitze (Caltech)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 16:00 - 17:30 Plenary 7 - Future detectors requirements, goals, possibilities
      Convener: Matthew Evans (MIT), Harald Lueck (AEI Hannover (MPI f. gravitational Physics / Inst. f. Grav.physics Leibniz Uni Hannover)), Michele Punturo (PG)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      Material: slides pdf file}
      • 16:00 Science targets for future detectors 20'
        Speaker: Salvatore Vitale (LIGO MIT)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 16:20 Synergy between space and terrestrial detectors 20'
        Speaker: Alberto Sesana (Birmingham)
      • 16:40 Low Frequency Noise Impact - Summary 20'
        Speakers: Jan Harms (FI), Jenne Driggers (Caltech)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 17:00 Lenses and wedges – Do these make sense for long arms? 20'
        Speaker: Stefan Ballmer (Syracuse University)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 17:30 - 18:00 coffee break ( Parking area )
    • 18:00 - 19:30 Plenary 7 - Future detectors requirements, goals, possibilities
      Convener: Matthew Evans (MIT), Harald Lueck (AEI Hannover (MPI f. gravitational Physics / Inst. f. Grav.physics Leibniz Uni Hannover)), Michele Punturo (PG)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      Material: slides pdf file}
      • 18:00 Scattering, technical noise and alignment, stability 20'
        Speaker: Matthew Evans (MIT)
      • 18:20 Triangles vs Ls 20'
        Speaker: Andreas Freise (University of Birmingham)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 18:40 Suspending 400kg mirrors 20'
        Speakers: Giles Hammond (University of Glasgow), Norna Robertson (LIGO-Caltech)
      • 19:00 Heterogeneous detector networks discussion 20'
        Speaker: Daniel Sigg (LIGO Hanford Observatory)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
  • Friday, 27 May 2016
    • 09:00 - 10:30 Plenary 8 - IFO configurations & squeezing
      Convener: Roman Schnabel (Hamburg University), Jean Pierre Zendri (PD), David McClelland (The Australian National University)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 09:00 Introduction 10'
        Speaker: David McClelland (The Australian National University)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:10 Squeezing at 1064nm 20'
        Speaker: Henning Vahlbruch (AEI Hannover)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:30 Squeezing at 1550nm and across the wavelengths 20'
        Speaker: Axel Schoenbeck (Hamburg University)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 09:50 Intracavity Squeezing I 20'
        Speaker: Yanbei Chen (California Institute of Technology)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 10:10 Intracavity Squeezing II 20'
        Speaker: Kentaro Somiya (Caltech)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 10:30 - 11:00 coffee break ( Parking area )
    • 11:00 - 12:30 Plenary 8 - IFO configurations & squeezing
      Convener: Roman Schnabel (Hamburg University), Jean Pierre Zendri (PD), David McClelland (The Australian National University)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 11:00 Quantum dense metrology 30'
        Speaker: Sebastian Steinlechner (University of Glasgow)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 11:30 New Topology Speedmeter 30'
        Speaker: Shtefan Danilishin (University of Glasgow)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 12:00 Atom Interferometer GW Detectors 30'
        Speaker: Philippe Bouyer (Bordeaux)
    • 12:30 - 15:30 lunch ( Fuoco di bosco )
    • 15:30 - 16:30 Thermal noise & coatings workshop
      Convener: Riccardo Bassiri (Stanford University), Gianpietro Cagnoli (LMA - UCBL), Eric Gustafson (Caltech), Iain Martin (University of Glasgow)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 15:30 Minimizing test mass thermal noise with crystalline coatings 30'
        Speaker: Garrett Cole (University of Vienna)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
      • 16:00 Discussion 30'
    • 16:30 - 17:30 Plenary 9 - Workshop summaries
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 16:30 Low Frequency 30'
        Speakers: Jan Harms (FI), Jo van den Brand (Nikhef - VU)
      • 17:00 Controls 30'
        Speakers: Dennis Coyne (LIGO Lab), Fabrice Matichard (MIT)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 17:30 - 18:00 coffee break ( Parking area )
    • 18:00 - 18:30 Plenary 9 - Workshop summaries
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
      • 18:00 Thermal noise & Coatings 30'
        Speakers: Riccardo Bassiri (Stanford University), Gianpietro Cagnoli (LMA - UCBL), Eric Gustafson (Caltech), Iain Martin (University of Glasgow)
        Material: Slides pdf file}
    • 18:30 - 19:00 Plenary 10 - Future plans
      Convener: Francesco Fidecaro (Pisa), Syd Meshkov (Caltech)
      Location: Sala Maria Luisa
    • 19:00 - 19:30 Summary
      Location: Hotel Hermitage, La Biodola, Isola D'Elba ( Sala Maria Luisa )
      • 19:00 GWADW 2016 Summary 30'
        Speaker: Alberto Lazzarini (Caltech - LIGO)
        Material: Slides pdf file}